Former Yellow Bee Member Ari Accuses Employee Of Sexual Assault In Response To Agency’s “Slut-Shaming”

“An employee dragged a member to the practice room to…”

Content Warning

This article includes descriptions of sexual assault that may disturb some readers.

Rookie girl group, Yellow Bee and their agency, Addiction Entertainment is facing controversy after the agency claimed that “Member B” being promiscuous was the reason why the group couldn’t continue in their statement announcing the group’s disbandment.

| @Ylb_Official/Twitter

But former Yellow Bee member, Ari took to her Instagram account to refute that on the contrary, it was an employee of the agency who sexually harassed them and that they even dragged a member away to attempt engaging in sexual acts.

| @dung._.hee/Instagram

Read the translation of Ari’s full post below:

Hello, this is Ari.

I apologize if this post is a little messy.

Considering how big the controversy has gotten, I thought it was necessary to clarify.

Our group is not so famous that we should be writing a clarification post, but because these news articles are gaining much more attention than when we debuted, we were taken aback by this much attention, and the story has blown out of proportion.

The agency claimed that the member was promiscuous, but I don’t know what the agency thinks that word means.

Is it promiscuous for a man and woman to stand outside together? Then is everyone promiscuous? What they said about being promiscuous is not true, and the agency exaggerated.

It wasn’t the member who was promiscuous, but rather the agency.

There were acts of sexual assault by an employee and manager of the agency.

And that employee even dragged a member away to a practice room and tried to engage in sexual relations, and on top of that, everybody was there when it happened, but it was only the members who tried to stop her from getting dragged away.

They also told us to call them ‘oppa’ and touched our thighs, and a former manager even said, ‘Let’s go to a motel so I can give you a baby’ and ‘But it’s up to you to find the father.’

There were even times when they called us in the middle of the night and offered us alcohol. But we all kept quiet about it because we wanted to become singers.

It was very shocking at the time, and I’m still traumatized about it now.

Also, we didn’t have any money, and we even took care of our own clothes, shoes, and video editing.

And when we had to go to Japan for our activities, the CEO said he was the only one available to drive us to the airport for our 5 AM flight, and once he got us there, he gave us a card and told us to buy the tickets ourselves and fly over to Japan.

We had never bought plane tickets before, and only our leader had a phone so we used that to make multiple calls and managed to buy our flights.

It took extra time because we wanted to find a cheaper flight, and it was 1 PM at the time.

We sat at Gimpo International Airport for 8 hours. But our flight was leaving from Incheon International Airport so we headed over while carrying our outfits, album posters, and personal belongings without any staff, and managed to get on our flight.

And when we were in Japan, we did everything on our own without staff. And everybody there knew. Our CEO went back to Korea early.

That wasn’t promiscuous behavior, but we weren’t treated fairly. We were treated unfairly in so many ways that we said we wanted to quit. We didn’t quit because of that member’s promiscuous behavior.

What I just told you were only a few things detailing our mistreatment. We were at conflict with each other in the beginning because of what the agency callled promiscuous, but it doesn’t make sense that that insignificant event has caused us to disband after how hard we worked to debut.

These matters were listed in the document we sent into the agency as well. The agency is making us out to be the bad ones, and we didn’t know what to do, so I decided to post this as the representative. Thank you for reading my long post.

— Ari